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Equipment Report
  • Adam Scott’s new Titleist irons 'one of one'

    Clubs are visually stunning but made just for him

  • A look at the new Titleist irons Adam Scott is playing, and they were made just for him. (Courtesy of GolfWRX)A look at the new Titleist irons Adam Scott is playing, and they were made just for him. (Courtesy of GolfWRX)

Adam Scott has used the same irons — Titleist Forged 680 — for the better part of 10 years. 

“When you’re old and stubborn, you like what you like,” the 41-year-old told PGATOUR.COM. 

Indeed, as he has transitioned into Titleist’s latest woods and wedges, the 14-time PGA TOUR winner has remained steadfast in playing his 2003 680 irons with KBS Tour 130 X shafts.  

It was interesting, then, to see Scott with a different — but very similar — set of irons in the bag ahead of THE CJ CUP @ SUMMIT.

At a glance, the visually stunning irons look identically shaped to the 680s we’re used to seeing in Scott’s bag — similar large muscle pad on the rear of the club, similar hosel transition, similar generous amount of offset, similar topline. However, the irons looked substantially less worn and were stamped with 681.AS on the hosel.  

What’s going on here? 

Titleist declined to comment, but PGATOUR.COM caught up with Scott, who shared some details. As it turns out the new irons are the same...sort of.  

Before digging into the 681.AS, we asked Scott why he doesn’t simply continue playing 680 irons, and when a set wears out, replace them with another. The answer, he said, was simple. Titleist “just ran out of original sets,” which the company stopped producing in 2005. 

titleist-Forged-680-3
(Courtesy of GolfWRX)

What to do? Scour eBay and used club stores? Frequent garage sales? 

Scott indicated Titleist engineers took a different tack: They made CAD (computer-aided design) copies of his beloved 680s and CNC-machined what he called, “basically the same clubs.” 

“Thanks to technology,” he said, “they’re as exact a replica as you can get, but with the way they’ve been made, I could argue it’s a more solid head with a more solid strike. 

“I’ve been stuck on the 680s for a long time now,” he added. “...We’ve tried some stuff here and there. We tried bending the 620 MBs earlier this year, which I actually used at the Masters. I’ve been looking for 12 months for that new fresh set with good feel in the hands and good vibes, and we just couldn’t get there, so they took this project on.” 

He continued: “It’s very nice for me that Titleist was able to do that. I know what I know. I’ve played it so long, I’m at a point where I think it’s detrimental to go searching and trying to change. I know how I play, and I know what I need to play well.”

titleist-681AS-2
(Courtesy of GolfWRX)

With respect to the question equipment junkies really want answered — whether the irons will ever arrive at retail in any limited or wide release — Scott indicated the 681.AS are truly “one of one.” He hopes that will change, however, so that he at least has enough irons to “see his career out,” he said, laughing. 

He doesn’t think younger players will be as drawn to the irons. “I grew up with a little bit more offset and a little more funk in the whole blade,” he said. “Things got really rounded and well-balanced over the last few years with far less offset.” 

A final note about the badging: Scott pointed out the “Titleist” stamp features the larger, more modern script. However, as a nod to the original 680, Titleist engineers used the old school numbers on the sole of the club.

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