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Equipment Report
  • EQUIPMENT

    What's in the bag: Matthew Wolff, Collin Morikawa

  • A look inside the bag of Matthew Wolff. (Courtesy of GolfWRX)A look inside the bag of Matthew Wolff. (Courtesy of GolfWRX)

Collin Morikawa and Matthew Wolff are two of the most exciting young players on the PGA TOUR. Morikawa already has four wins, including a major and World Golf Championship, while the 22-year-old Wolff is just the third player to win the NCAA title and a PGA TOUR title in the same season. He also finished in the top four of two majors last year.

The two stars are teaming up together at this week’s Zurich Classic of New Orleans in hopes of securing another title. Morikawa is known for his precise iron play, while Wolff unique, powerful swing and his prowess off the tee is his trademark

So with that, let’s take a look inside the bags of these TaylorMade staff players to see how their setups compare.

Drivers

Morikawa: TaylorMade SIM (8 degrees @ 8.5 degrees) Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ Limited 70 TX

Wolff: TaylorMade M1 460 (10.5 degrees @ 9 degrees) Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD HD 7x

There are a couple of things going on between these two drivers, with the most noted being Matthew just went back to using a TaylorMade M1 460 which was launched in 2017. This is the same driver he used back in when he was runner up in the 2017 USGA U.S. Junior Am, and just like many golfers that have a favorite putter or wedge, we've been told that with his recent struggles off the tee he wanted to try something that he was really comfortable with. Think of it like putting on that old favorite band shirt—something about it just feels right.

As for the driver setups, the next biggest contrast is how both Collin and Matthew use the adjustable loft sleeves in different ways to achieve desired results. Morikawa prefers to use a lower-lofted driver and close the face, which actually increases loft, while Wolff goes with a higher-lofted driver and opens the face to decrease loft. Even though the stated loft numbers on the drivers is 2.5 degrees apart, once adjusted, they're only separated by half of a degree.

There are a lot of reasons players might choose to play a driver more open or closed-looking, but the general consensus is about creating the right optics from address to inspire confidence.

equipmentmorikawa-847-golfwrx
A look inside the bag of Collin Morikawa. (Courtesy of GolfWRX)

Fairway woods

Morikawa: TaylorMade SIM Titanium (15 degrees @ 13.5 degrees) Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ Limited 80 TX/TaylorMade SIM2 (19 degrees) Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana D+ Limited 80 TX

Wolff: TaylorMade SIM2 Titanium (15 degrees) Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD XC 8 X

Just like with his driver, Morikawa uses the adjustable hosel to dial in the loft and the look he wants at address with his 3-wood. He opens the face to reduce the loft, while Wolff leaves his set to standard.

Morikawa also carries a 5-wood to create proper gapping into his irons, whereas Wolff only has a single 3-wood. Both players have a lot of clubhead speed: Morikawa averages close to 114 mph with his driver, and Wolff is at 122 mph.

The 5-wood helps create spin and height a lot easier than a 3-iron, which means the ball comes in higher and stops sooner, which is crucial when hitting approach shots into long holes.

Irons

Morikawa: TaylorMade P770 (4-iron), P7MC (5-6), TaylorMade P730 (7-PW) Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wolff: TaylorMade P7MC (3-PW) Shafts: Project X 6.5

Morikawa plays a mixed set of TaylorMade irons that includes a faster-faced, foam-filled 4-iron, which transitions to a small cavity back with his 5- and 6-irons and then blades with his short irons. This gives a little extra forgiveness in the long irons, the preferred trajectory with each club and maintains a proper gap in the distance between each of his irons. Wolff, on the other hand, uses a single model throughout his entire set. This could be for a number of reasons, including having a consistent look from club to club.

Wedges

Morikawa: TaylorMade MG2 (50, 60 degrees), Titleist Vokey Design SM8 56-14F (bent to 55 degrees) Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Wolff: TaylorMade MG2 (50-09SB, 56-12SB, 60-09LB) Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Both golfers use the same 50, 56, and 60-degree wedge setup. The only tweak is that Morikawa has his 56-degree wedge bent one degree strong to fit particular yardage. A three-wedge setup (three wedges beyond a pitching wedge) is by far the most common configuration on TOUR because, with so many shots hit inside 100 yards, having a club for any situation can save valuable strokes.

Putters

Morikawa: TaylorMade Spider FCG

Wolff: TaylorMade TP Berwick

Both the TaylorMade Spider FCG and the TP Berwick are mallet-style putters that offer higher MOI and grooved inserts to improve ball roll around the face. FCG stands for Forward Center of Gravity, and Morikawa’s Spider putter is specifically designed to play like a blade but offer the alignment of a bigger front-to-back mallet putter.

Balls

Morikawa: TaylorMade TP5

Wolff: TaylorMade TP5 ’21 Pix

Both golfers use the same model ball, which should work well this week in Zurich's team format. The only difference is Wolff uses the "Pix" version of TaylorMade's TP5 ball, which features extra graphics for alignment. The TP5 is a slightly softer and higher-spinning ball compared to TaylorMade's other premium option, the TP5x.

Using the same model means each golfer won't have to make any adjustments for distance or shot preference around the greens. As for graphics or no graphics during the alternate shot —we'll leave that debate up to Collin and Matthew.

Grips

Morikawa: Golf Pride Z-Grip Cord

Wolff: Golf Pride Z-Grip Cord (+3 double-sided tape)

Both Morikawa and Wolff play the same model of grip. Wolff has three extra layers of tape under his, however, to make them thicker.

Although their clubs are similar, it’s the small details of each set that allows both players to perform their best and makes them one of the teams to watch this week.