HP Byron Nelson interview: Keegan Bradley

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May 18, 2013


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HP Byron Nelson transcripts

THE MODERATOR:
We would like to welcome Keegan Bradley yet again, getting to know this place well. You got to 13‑under today. If you want to talk about the highlights of your round and then some questions.

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
I played solid today. One of the most solid rounds of the year considering all that was going on windy, putted very well, looking forward to the weekend.

Q. I hate to bring it up, 18. Again, it just seems to be a troubling hole. Obviously you took a different line today.

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
Yeah, tomorrow is the day, right down the middle on the green. I'm due! (Laughter.) Today's tee ball was really good. I smashed it, it was, you know, just didn't take the wind. It's a tough hole for everybody, a lot of bogeys on that hole.

But I hung in there, I almost made par. Tomorrow I'm going to stripe it. I'm due. I know that I'll hit a good one tomorrow.

Q. What's the mind‑set going into tomorrow when you look at the conditions? I guess it's supposed to be windier. Does that make it easier for the guys behind you or harder? And do you like playing in a tougher condition?

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
Makes it harder if I play well; it's harder for them to catch me. But it's the same for everybody. I've won here in really windy conditions. Today was pretty windy but this course was set up to where it can be windy and you can play it. It's kind of like Kapalua, where it can blow really hard, but it's still playable. The staff here does a really good job with that. I'm fine with it being windier, same for everybody.

Q. I know that you're a student of golf history and everything. Talk about Ken Venturi, watching him play, passing away yesterday, what that meant, what Ken meant to you, and I'm sure you heard him a lot on TV.

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
Yeah, he's a mentor of my coach, Jim McLean, big‑time mentor, that's his guy.

The year that I won we worked on something where I took the club away, against the wall, to not take it too far outside and Byron Nelson passed that along to Ken Venturi, who passed it along to Jim McLean, so a cool connection to Byron Nelson. But he's an icon of the game, both playing and in the booth and great guy. He will be missed by everybody.

Q. Keegan, you have a unique approach to the ball. Can you talk about how that's developed and evolved?

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
You know, it's something where I kind of like to equate it to a tennis player waiting for a serve, and I don't like to stand there, staying still.

I don't like to be idle; it's just a way for me to get myself going to hit the shot. A lot of people don't like it. I get a lot of flack for it on Twitter and stuff, but it works for me. It's unique. It's so different than what everybody else does, I can see why people would think it was weird.

Q. How good was the recovery on 18? Can you talk about what happened there?

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
Yeah, you know, the drive I hit was smashed, and it flew and‑‑ to be honest with you, I thought it was in the water, but another foot to the right and I'm actually almost in the fairway so it could have gone either way. I had no stance to hit the ball on the green, let alone I had a huge rock in front of me. I had the chip out backwards, didn't hit a great shot, and I thought I made the putt, which would have been exciting, but 5 in that hole from where I hit it off the tee is a pretty good score.

Q. There hasn't been a wire‑to‑wire winner here since Watson in '80. Do you remember a tournament like this where you've gotten and held such a lead in the first three rounds?

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
No, not on the PGA TOUR. I did it in the Hooter's Tour. I led wire to wire, and I don't think much of it. Should be easier than having to come from behind. I'm fine with it. I have felt comfortable out there, haven't felt nervous. I feel like I put the time in, I feel like this is where I should be when I play well is near the lead or in the lead.

Q. Keegan, given the conditions and how tough they were, it's almost like you have to grind away, and that seems to be something that suits your game and approach and it's not a complete birdiefest out there; would you say that's correct?

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
Absolutely, yeah, I seem to like a winning score around 10‑under, normally. But, you know, these last couple of rounds have been a lot more difficult than the first round. When it's tough conditions I think that the players that are ready for it play well. That doesn't happen all the time, but I think if you're‑‑ stay patient, do what you're supposed to do, I'm going to make some birdies out there because of my length, and the par 5s, and just stay patient and stay with it.

Q. Dufner on the basketball court. Can you talk about how you can dominate? How did that go last night?

KEEGAN BRADLEY:
Actually me and "The Duf" were teammates last night, which is a rare thing. We played team horse against Steve Marino and his caddy and Matt Every and his caddy, and me and Duf were partners. We actually won a couple of games. "The Duf" can shoot!

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