Photo Gallery

The Tour Report
file

July 1 2012

12:30 AM

Notes from inside the ropes

Live Report Image
Carr/Getty Images
Beau Hossler (right), who shot a 77, walks off the 10th green with no spectators on the course on Saturday.
By Fred Albers, PGATOUR.COM Correspondent BETHESDA, Md. -- There was little applause at the AT&T National at Congressional Country Club on Saturday. None of the "oohs" and "aahs" the PGA TOUR players are used to hearing took place. The overnight storms made it necessary to close the course to all but essential personnel. So, after players hit good shots there was no applause from the gallery. Some players improvised. When Robert Garrigus made a 10-foot putt on the first hole, he held up his hand as if to thank the gallery while his fellow competitor Pat Perez applauded. The two of them then shared a laugh together. Tiger walk: Tiger Woods still commanded the largest gallery of the day. However, instead of thousands there were about 75 people walking the course with him. Most of that was comprised of volunteers and media. The public missed out on a spectacular opening nine holes. Woods used just five putts in the first six holes that included a chip-in birdie at the sixth. Tough week for caddies: It has been a tough week to be a caddie on the PGA TOUR. Five caddies could not complete Friday's second round because of heat exhaustion and Robert Garrigus’ caddie, Brent Henley, hit his head on the side of the caddie trailer and opened a cut that required 40 stitches. Henley was back on the bag Saturday with a huge bandage wrapped around his forehead. PGA Tour players took turns signing that bandage. Water wagon: There were no vending stations on the course to purchase water on Saturday but it was not a problem. The tournament provided free water for the small gallery and media by filling a modified golf cart with ice and water bottles, then dispersing it freely to a grateful gallery. Disaster avoided: Every disaster contains the story of a person who narrowly missed his or her connection on a flight that crashed or the driver that chose to stop at a yellow light and missed the four-car pileup on the other side of the intersection. The storm that caused millions of dollars in damage on the East Coast on Friday had its own story with a happy ending. For the past two weeks, the tournament operations manager has lived out of a temporary trailer behind the fifth tee. He moved out of those makeshift quarters on Friday evening to spend the night with his family. During the stormy night, a large tree fell and crushed that trailer, flattening it like a pancake. Call it good luck, good fortune, or a nice coincidence. But a possible tragedy was avoided.
Filed under:    
comments powered by Disqus