Round 3 Notebook: Principal Charity Classic

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June 06, 2010
PGA TOUR staff

Final Leaderboard: 1 -- Nick Price (-14); 2 -- Tommy Armour III (-10); T3 -- John Cook and Loren Roberts (-9), T5 -- Jeff Sluman, Russ Cochran, Don Pooley, Chip Beck, Bruce Vaughan and Dan Forsman (-8).

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Tournament Recap: After suffering a heart-breaking playoff loss last year at Glen Oaks, Nick Price redeemed himself with a four-stroke victory over Tommy Armour III this year. Price started the final round tied with Armour for the lead. Price birdied No. 4 to take the lead for good, but it was a chip-in birdie from 75 feet at No. 6 that gave him a cushion. He then added birdies at Nos. 9 and 10 to increase his margin to four strokes over Armour who had made 10 consecutive pars. Price's lead was eventually reduced to two shot after he made only his third bogey of the week at No. 17, but Armour's flickering hopes faded after he pulled his drive in the left bunker on the final hole.

Nick Price's win on Sunday was his third official title on the Champions Tour and he joined Fred Couples (3) and Bernhard Langer (2) as the third multiple winner on the circuit in 2010. Earlier this year, Price teamed with Mark O'Meara to win the Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf and his victory today gives him multiple titles in a season for the first time since 1994, when he claimed six events and was the PGA TOUR's Player of the Year.

• Price's victory made him the first player since R.W. Eaks (2007 Greater Hickory Classic at Rock Barn) to win an event after losing the same tournament the year before in a playoff (to Mark McNulty). Price's previous-best finish this year in a stroke-play event was a T4 at The Cap Cana Championship in the Dominican Republic.

• Prior to Price winning this year's event, there had never been a Principal Charity Classic champion who had won a major on the PGA TOUR. Among Price's 18 TOUR titles were three major titles -- 1992 PGA Championship, 1994 British Open, 1994 PGA Championship.

• After eight consecutive years without an international winner, The Principal Charity Classic has now had back-to-back natives of South Africa win this event -- Price (2010) and Mark McNulty (2009). Two years ago, Price finished T3 in Des Moines and last year he was T2. He's now had nine straight sub-par rounds at Glen Oaks with his last eight rounds in Iowa have been in the 60s.

• Price's winning total of 14-under 199 was the seventh 54-hole event this year on the Champions Tour that was won with a sub-200 score. Last year, only four three-round events all season had sub-200 totals. Price's score at Glen Oaks this year was the lowest since 2006 when Gil Morgan shot the tournament record of 16-under 197. Jim Thorpe's total of 14-under 199 at the inaugural event is the only other sub-200 score by a winner at this event.

• Price's four-stroke victory over Tommy Armour III is the largest winning margin in tournament history and equals Fred Couples' 4-shot win at the Toshiba Classic as the largest margin of victory on the Champions Tour this year. Don Pooley (2003), D.A. Weibring (2004) and Jay Haas (2007) held the previous mark of a three-stroke margin at this event.

• Price earned a check for $258,750 and also earned 259 Charles Schwab Cup points. Couples still leads the 2010 Schwab Cup race with 1,367 points Price's victory moved him up one spot into third place with 872 points. Tom Lehman, idle on the Champions Tour this week, is in second place with 1,095 points. At the end of the official season, the player with the most Schwab Cup points will earn a $1 million payout.

Loren Roberts, winner of the Charles Schwab Cup in two of the last three years, carded a final-round 68 and his T3 this week was his best finish of the 2010 season. Roberts' third-place effort at the 2010 Principal Charity Classic was also his fourth consecutive top-10 performance in Des Moines, tying him with Allen Doyle, Bruce Lietzke and Tom Kite for the most top-10s in event history.

• The field averaged 70.644 this year, the best stroke average at this event since 2006. Last year, Glen Oaks played to a stroke average of 71.279. This year, 42 professionals finished the tournament under par compared to 35 players under par last year.

• The par-3 2nd hole played as the most difficult for the week, yielding just 19 birdies and a stroke average of 3.215. The par-5 9th hole was the easiest with a stroke average of 4.451. No. 9 yielded eight eagles and 123 birdies this year. Overall, there were 795 birdies made at this year's event, eight more birdies than last year.

• Sixty-six year old Bruce Summerhays, a three-time winner on the Champions Tour, finished T52 in the final performance of his career. Summerhays is stepping away from professional golf after 17 years on the circuit to begin a three-year stint as mission president for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Summerhays will move with his wife Carolyn to Tampa, Fla., where he's slated to begin his new duties on June 28.

• Following the conclusion of the tournament, Russ Gibson from Dallas Center, Iowa won a putting contest that earned him an all-expense paid trip to the final round of next year's Masters.

• The weekly attendance at this year's Principal Charity Classic was 73,909, a tournament record, surpassing the 73,000 who came out during the week at the 2002 event.

• A number of Champions Tour players will try to earn their way into the U.S. Open Championship at Pebble Beach at various sectional qualifying sites on Monday (June 7). Tom Kite, the winner of the 1992 U.S. Open at Pebble, is among 29 players for two spots at Columbine Country Club in Littleton, Colo. Corey Pavin, the 1995 U.S. Open champion, is among 31 players for two spots at Bull Valley Country Club in Woodstock, Ill. Others attempting to qualify include: Robin Freeman and Mike Goodes at Woodmont Country Club in Rockville, Md. (78 players for seven spots), Bobby Clampett and Tom Lehman at Brookside Country Club/The Lakes Country Club in Columbus, Oh. (120 players for 15 spots).

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